LE MYSTÈRE D’ÉLISE

Our winter collection 2017/18 – a sweet temptation

Inspired by the pretty and mysterious Élise from Paris, we are presenting our Tafelzier winter collection with different tastes of gingerbread for the very first time.

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The Patissier

Jens Brockerhof

After training to be a chef, pastry baker and master pastry baker, the startup of a catering business and a star restaurant, Jens Brockerhof realised his long-nurtured wish – his own pastry shop – Tafelzier.

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Tafelzier Nuremberg. Pastry and sweets artisanry
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Tafelzier – Tempel of Sin

Patisserie – Weintraubengasse 2 – Nuremberg

As you stride through the door at Tafelzier you should look out. At first glance small, colourful and refined delicacies compete for your attention. But if you look carefully you will discover sin, aphrodisiacs, mood changers, little presents in lieu of flowers, meeting sweeteners, desserts, in-law ingratiators, proof of friendship, chef’s mood mollifiers, gratitude expressions, princess desserts, adventure trips, items of jewellery and calorie bombs. Self-help products for low-sugar sufferers, wedding day savers, soul comforters, euphoriants and lots more.

Let yourself be inspired.

Special Opening Hours
November-December 2017

TAFELZIER Shop
Weintraubengasse 2
D-90403 Nuremberg

Tuesday to Saturday:
10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Sunday: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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Tafelzier – a Name with Tradition

Origins of this masterful art

The word Tafelzier (German for table decoration) comes from the origins of Patisserie in the 17th century. At that time there was still no porcelain. Table and space decorations were produced by pastry bakers by means of tragant (a rubberlike plant sap from the astralgalus tree, native to Asia Minor).

As a high point at famous gluttony orgies and gala dinners in the baroque and rococo periods this craftsman’s artwork was served to guests. By using the historical concept of “Tafelzier” (German for gourmet decoration) a tradition has been brought back to life, but this time interpreted in a contemporary and modern way.